Christmas

During this season of Advent, we would like to share some short stories, scripture, poems and essays with you over the coming weeks regarding Jesus’s birth and the indescribable gift we have been blessed with should we chose to accept it. Today we are presenting a poem by Saint Augustine of Hippo. In this poem written some fifteen centuries ago, Augustine sought to capture the mystery of the incarnation.

Maker of the sun,

He is made under the sun.

In the Father he remains,

From his mother he goes forth.

Creator of heaven and earth,

He was born on earth under heaven.

Unspeakably wise,

He is wisely speechless.

Filling the world,

He lies in a manger.

Ruler of the stars,

He nurses at his mother’s bosom.

He is both great in the nature of God,

and small in the form of a servant.

The Shepherd’s Field

During this season of Advent, we would like to share some short stories, scripture and essays with you over the coming weeks regarding Jesus’s birth and the indescribable gift we have been blessed with should we chose to accept it. Today we are presenting a short “The Shepard’s Field” by Jean-Baptiste-Henri Lacordaire.

The field of the shepherd’s is still there; flocks freed in the winter under the olives, as in the days of Jesus, in the field where the grass still grows green, and the anemones flower. Worship has never left the place where shone the brightness of the birthday dawn of Christ. On Christmas evening the people of Bethlehem flock to the church of St. Helena, of which only the ruins remain, and in its desolate crypt they pray to the shepherds Beir-Saour, their ancestors, who were the first apostles. Clad in their long white veils, seated in groups on the broken walls, beneath the shade of the circling olives, the women, seen from afar, recall the mysterious beings who heralded the advent of Jesus. They crowd has an aid of cheerfulness and calm, which harmonizes well with the memories of which the plain is full; and with that Eastern light which colors the whole and gives to the sterile rock itself an appearance of richness and of life.

Some Questions For Joseph

During this season of Advent, we would like to share some short stories, scripture and essays with you over the coming weeks regarding Jesus’s birth and the indescribable gift we have been blessed with should we chose to accept it. We hope you meditate on these through this Advent season. Today we are presenting a short “25 Questions For Mary ” from Max Lucado. You can learn more about Max Lucado here.

Twenty-Five questions For Mary

  1. What was it like watching him Pray?
  2. How did he respond when he saw other kids giggling during the serve at the synagogue?
  3. When he saw a rainbow, did he ever mention a flood?
  4. Did you ever feel awkward teaching how he created the world?
  5. When he a saw a lamb being led to slaughter, did he act differently?
  6. Did you ever see him with a distant look on his face as if he were listening to someone you couldn’t hear?
  7. How did he act a funerals?
  8. Did the thought ever occur to you that the God to whom you were praying was asleep under you rook?
  9. Did you ever try to count the stars with him….and succeed?
  10. Did he ever come home with a black eye?
  11. How did he act when he got his first haircut?
  12. Did he have any friends by the name of Judas?
  13. Did he do well in school?
  14. Did you ever scold him?
  15. Did he ever have to ask a question about Scripture?
  16. What do you think he though when he saw a prostitute offering to the highest bidder the body he made?
  17. Did he ever get angry when someone was dishonest with him?
  18. Did you ever catch him pensively looking at the flesh on his own arm while holding a clod of dirt?
  19. Did he ever wake up afraid?
  20. Who was his best friend?
  21. When someone referred how did he act?
  22. Did you ever accidentally call him Father?
  23. What did he and his cousin John talk about as kids?
  24. Did his other brothers and sisters understand what was happening?
  25. Did you ever think, That’s God eating my soup?

WEEKLY MEDITATION 8 -14 DECEMBER 2014

During this Advent season, we ask that you meditate on the following scriptures, how they apply to your life and your growing relationship with the Lord.

“Serve wholeheartedly, as if you were serving the Lord, not men” (Ephesians 6:7)

“Acknowledge the God of your father, and serve him with the wholehearted devotion and with a willing mind, for the Lord searches every heart and understand every motive behind the thoughts. If you seek him, he will be found by you; but if you forsake him, he will reject you forever. (1Chronicles 28:9)

“What ever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for men, since you know that you will receive an inheritance from the Lord as a reward. It is the Lord Christ you are serving” (Colossians 3:23-24)

 

The Season of Advent

We wanted to share some information on the Advent season for those who may not know much about it. Advent is a time of preparing our hearts for the celebration of Christ’s birth. Advent is the beginning of the Church Year for most churches in the Western tradition. It begins on the fourth Sunday before Christmas Day, which is the Sunday nearest November 30, and ends on Christmas Eve (Dec 24). If Christmas Eve is a Sunday, it is counted as the fourth Sunday of Advent, with Christmas Eve proper beginning at sundown.

The spirit of Advent is expressed well in the parable of the bridesmaids who are anxiously awaiting the coming of the Bridegroom (Matt 25:1-13). There is profound joy at the Bridegroom’s expected coming. And yet a warning of the need for preparation echoes through the parable. But even then, the prayer of Advent is still:

Come, O Come, Emmanuel,
And ransom captive Israel!

 

The general topic of Advent is the coming of Jesus Christ, both in the manger in Bethlehem and in the clouds of glory.

In the west during the Middle Ages, Advent became a time to prepare for the Second Coming, because in those days, many people were convinced that all the signs pointed to the imminent return of Christ. In time, Advent spread throughout the western Church and became fixed at its present length. Over the last fifty years, Advent has come to anticipate the Nativity as well. Unfortunately, for to many people today, especially retailers, Advent is just a ramp-up to Christmas and a focus on material possessions that Jesus and others have warned us against.

The Meaning of Advent

The word Advent means “coming” or “arrival.” The focus of the entire season is the celebration of the birth of Jesus the Christ in his First Advent, and the anticipation of the return of Christ the King in his Second Advent. Thus, Advent is far more than simply marking a 2,000 year old event in history. It is celebrating a truth about God, the revelation of God in Christ whereby all of creation might be reconciled to God. That is a process in which we now participate, and the consummation of which we anticipate. Scripture reading for Advent will reflect this emphasis on the Second Advent, including themes of accountability for faithfulness at His coming, judgment on sin, and the hope of eternal life.

In this double focus on past and future, Advent also symbolizes the spiritual journey of individuals and a congregation, as they affirm that Christ has come, that He is present in the world today, and that He will come again in power. That acknowledgment provides a basis for Kingdom ethics, for holy living arising from a profound sense that we live “between the times” and are called to be faithful stewards of what is entrusted to us as God’s people. So, as the church celebrates God’s inbreaking into history in the Incarnation, and anticipates a future consummation to that history for which “all creation is groaning awaiting its redemption,” it also confesses its own responsibility as a people commissioned to “love the Lord your God with all your heart” and to “love your neighbor as yourself.”

The Spirit of Advent

Advent is marked by a spirit of expectation, of anticipation, of preparation, of longing. There is a yearning for deliverance from the evils of the world, first expressed by Israelite slaves in Egypt as they cried out from their bitter oppression. It is the cry of those who have experienced the tyranny of injustice in a world under the curse of sin, and yet who have hope of deliverance by a God who has heard the cries of oppressed slaves and brought deliverance!

It is that hope, however faint at times, and that God, however distant He sometimes seems, which brings to the world the anticipation of a King who will rule with truth and justice and righteousness over His people and in His creation. It is that hope that once anticipated, and now anticipates anew, the reign of an Anointed One, a Messiah, who will bring peace and justice and righteousness to the world.

Part of the expectation also anticipates a judgment on sin and a calling of the world to accountability before God. We long for God to come and set the world right! Yet, as the prophet Amos warned, the expectation of a coming judgment at the “Day of the Lord” may not be the day of light that we might want, because the penetrating light of God’s judgment on sin will shine just as brightly on God’s people.

Because of this important truth, especially in the Eastern Orthodox Churches, the Season of Advent has been a time of fasting and penitence for sins similar to the Season of Lent. However, a different emphasis for the season of Advent has gradually unfolded in much of the rest of the church. The season of Advent has come to be celebrated more in terms of expectation or anticipation. Yet, the anticipation of the Coming of the Messiah throughout the Old Testament and Judaism was not in connection with remembrance of sins. Rather, it was in the context of oppression and injustice, the longing for redemption, not from personal guilt and sin but from the systemic evil of the world expressed in evil empires and tyrants. It is in that sense that all creation groans for its redemption as we witness the evil that so dominates our world (Rom 8:18-25).

Of course, there is the problem of longing for vindication from an evil world when we are contributors to that evil. This is the power of the images of Amos when he warns about longing for the “Day of the Lord” that will really be a day of darkness (Amos 5:18-20). Still, even with Amos’ warning the time of Advent is one of expectation and anticipation, a longing for God’s actions to restore all things and vindicate the righteous. This is why during Advent we as Christians also anticipate the Second Coming as a twin theme of the season. So, while some church traditions focus on penitence during Advent, and there remains a place for that, the spirit of that expectation from the Old Testament is better captured with a joyous sense of expectancy. Rather than a time of mourning and fasting, Advent is celebrated as a time of joy and happiness as we await the coming of the King.

So, we celebrate with gladness the great promise in the Advent, yet knowing that there is also a somber tone as the theme of threat is added to the theme of promise. This is reflected in some of the Scripture readings for Advent, in which there is a strong prophetic tone of accountability and judgment on sin. But this is also faithful to the role of the Coming King who comes to rule, save, and judge the world.

Because of the dual themes of threat and promise, Advent is a time of preparation that is marked by prayer. While Lent is characterized by fasting and a spirit of penitence, Advent’s prayers are prayers of humble devotion and commitment, prayers of submission, prayers for deliverance, prayers from those walking in darkness who are awaiting and anticipating a great light (Isa 9)!

 

alephamega3_jpg

This is an Advent symbol of Jesus from Rev 1:8 and 22:13:  “‘I am the Alpha and the Omega [the first and the last, the beginning and the end],’ says the Lord God, who is and who was and who is to come, the Almighty”  (see also Isaiah 44:6).

The blue letter is the first letter of the Hebrew alphabet, Aleph, and the purple is the last letter of the Greek alphabet, Omega.  Not only does this symbolize the One who has come and will come again, it also emphasizes the continuity of God’s work in history throughout both the Old and New Testaments.

Small Things and Possibility: The Spirit of Advent (taken in part from Dennis Bratcher’s essay on Advent from the Christian Research Institute)

We live in a world in which bigger and better define our expectations for much of life. We have become so enamored by super size, super stars, and high definition that we tend to view life through a lens that so magnifies what we expect out of the world that we tend not to see potential in small things. But as the prophet Zechariah reminds us (Zech 4:10), we should not “despise the day of small things,” because God does some of his best work with small beginnings and impossible situations.

It is truly a humbling experience to read back through the Old Testament and see how frail and imperfect all the “heroes” actually are. Abraham, the coward who cannot believe the promise. Jacob, the cheat who struggles with everybody. Joseph, the immature and arrogant teen. Moses, the impatient murderer who cannot wait for God. Gideon, the cowardly Baal-worshipper. Samson, the womanizing drunk. David, the power abusing adulterer. Solomon, the unwise wise man. Hezekiah, the reforming king who could not quite go far enough. And finally, a very young Jewish girl from a small village in a remote corner of a great empire.

It never ceases to amaze me that God often begins with small things and inadequate people.  It certainly seems that God could have chosen “bigger” things and “better” people to do His work in the world. Yet if God can use them, and reveal Himself through them in such marvelous ways, it means that He might be able to use me, inadequate, and unwise, and too often lacking in faith that I am. And it means that I need to be careful that I do not in my own self-righteousness put limits on what God can do with the smallest things, the most unlikely of people, in the most hopeless of circumstances. I think that is part of the wonder of the Advent Season.

I am convinced that one of the main purposes of the incarnation of Jesus was to provide hope. While most people today want to talk about the death of Jesus and the Atonement of sins, the early Church celebrated the Resurrection and the hope it embodied. It was a proclamation of a truth that rang throughout the Old Testament, that endings are not always endings but are opportunities for God to bring new beginnings. The Resurrection proclaimed that truth even about humanity’s greatest fear, death itself.

Both the season of Advent and the season of Lent are about hope. It is not just hope for a better day or hope for the lessening of pain and suffering, although that is certainly a significant part of it. It is more about hope that human existence has meaning and possibility beyond our present experiences, a hope that the limits of our lives are not nearly as narrow as we experience them to be. It is not that we have possibility in ourselves, but that God is a God of new things and so all things are possible (Isa 42:9, Mt 19:26, Mk 14:36)

God’s people in the first century wanted Him to come and change their oppressive circumstances, and were angry when those immediate circumstances did not change. But that is a short sighted view of the nature of hope. Our hope cannot be in circumstances, no matter how badly we want them or how important they are to us. The reality of human existence, with which the Book of Job struggles, is that God’s people experience that physical existence in the same way that others do. Christians get sick and die, Christians are victims of violent crimes, and Christians are hurt and killed in traffic accidents, bombings, war, and in some parts of the world, famine (seeThe Problem of Natural Evil).

If our hope is only in our circumstances, as we define them to be good or as we want them to be to make us happy, we will always be disappointed. That is why we hope, not in circumstances, but in God. He has continually, over the span of four thousand years, revealed himself to be a God of newness, of possibility, of redemption, the recovery or transformation of possibility from endings that goes beyond what we can think or even imagine (Eph 3:20). The best example of that is the crucifixion itself, followed by the resurrection. That shadow of the cross falls even over the manger.

Yet, it all begins in the hope that God will come and come again into our world to reveal himself as a God of newness, of possibility, a God of new things.  This time of year we contemplate that hope embodied, enfleshed, incarnated, in a newborn baby, the perfect example of newness, potential, and possibility. During Advent, we groan and long for that newness with the hope, the expectation, indeed the faith, that God will once again be faithful to see our circumstances, to hear our cries, to know our longings for a better world and a whole life (Ex 3:7).  And we hope that as he first came as an infant, so he will come again as King! (See The Second Coming)

My experience tells me that those who have suffered and still hope understand far more about God and about life than those who have not. Maybe that is what hope is about: a way to live, not just to survive, but to live authentically amidst all the problems of life with a Faith that continues to see possibility when there is no present evidence of it, just because God is God. That is also the wonder of Advent.

We hope that this information will help you understand and incorporate the Advent into your Christmas season. After all, Christmas is the celebration of the birth of our Lord and savior Jesus Christ.

WEEKLY MEDITATION 30 NOVEMBER – 7 DECEMBER 2014

As we begin this first week of the Advent season, we ask that you meditate on the following scriptures, how they apply to your life and your growing relationship with the Lord.

“I wait for the Lord, my soul waits, and in his word I put my hope” (Psalm 130:5)

“Be still before the Lord and wait patiently for him; do not fret when men succeed in their ways, when they carry out their wicked schemes” (Psalm 37:7)

“Though you have not see him, you love him; and even though you do not see him now, you believe in him and are filled with an inexpressible and glorious joy, for you are receiving the goal of your faith, the salvation of your souls” (1 Peter 1:8-9)

WEEKLY MEDITATION 24-30 NOVEMBER 2014

As you begin this week of  Thanksgiving in the United States, we ask that you meditate on the following scriptures and how they apply to your life and your growing relationship with the Lord. We have much to be thankful for.

“Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good; his love endures forever” (1 Chronicles 16:34)

“Sine we are receiving a Kingdom that cannot be shaken, let us be thankful, and so worship God acceptably with reverence and awe” (Hebrews 12:28)

“Give thanks in all circumstance, for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus” (1 Thessalonians 5:181)

Let them give thanks to the Lord for his unfailing love and his wonderful deeds for men, for he satisfies the thirsty and fills the hungry with good things” (Psalm 107:8-9)

 

WEEKLY MEDIATION 17-23 NOVEMBER 2014

As you begin this week, we ask that you meditate on the following scriptures and how they apply to your life and your growing relationship with the Lord.

“Be Kind and compassionate to one another, forgiving each other, just as in Christ God forgave you” (Ephesians 4:32)

“As God’s chosen people, holy and dearly loved, clothe yourselves with compassion, Kindness, humility, gentleness and patience” (Colossians 3:12)

“Love is patient, love is Kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud” (1 Corinthians 13:4)

WEEKLY MEDITATION 10-16 NOVEMBER 2014

As you begin this week, we ask that you meditate on the following scriptures and how they apply to your life and your growing relationship with the Lord.

“I guide you in the way of wisdom and lead you along straight paths” (Proverbs 4:11)

“The LORD will guid you always; he will satisfy your needs in a sun scorched land and will strengthen your frame. You will be like a well-watered garden, like a spring who’s waters never fail” (Isaiah 58:11)

“Trust in the LORD with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways acknowledge him, and he will make your paths straight” (Proverbs 3:5-6)

WEEKLY MEDITATION 3-9 NOVEMBER 2014

As you begin this week, we ask that you meditate on the following scriptures and how they apply to your life and your growing relationship with the Lord.

“If you love me, you will obey my commands. Those who know my commands and obey them are the ones who love me, and my Father will love those who love me. I will love them and will show myself to them” (John 14:15, 21)

“The most important command is this…Love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, all you mind, and all your strength” (Mark 12:29-30)

“We love because God first loved us…Those who do not love their brothers and sisters, whom they have seen, cannot love God, whom they never seen. And God gave us this command: Those who love God must also love their brothers and sisters” (1 John 4:19-21)